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Chemistry of polymers

  • M. H. Irfan
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Abstract

A polymer may be defined as a macromolecule formed by the chemical combination of identical units called monomers. The process by which polymers are formed is known as polymerisation. Polymerisation occurs via addition reaction or condensation reaction. The molecular weight of commercially important synthetic polymers is of the order of several thousands of daltons or higher. There are innumerable polymers used in countless applications. Polymer chemistry is a very wide subject, and innovations are continuously taking place. The aim of this chapter is not to discuss the generalities of polymer chemistry but to instil in the minds of readers some specific aspects of polymers used in the construction industry. These polymers include epoxies, polyurethanes, acrylics, silicones, polysulphides, alkyds and polyesters. Each polymer is discussed in a separate section covering only those aspects of chemistry which are related to construction industry products. Generalities of polymer chemistry and in-depth aspects of various polymers have been extensively covered by our pioneers in their publications. The lists of references and suggested readings given at the end of this chapter mention several useful publications for in-depth reading.

Keywords

Unsaturated Polyester Alkyd Resin Epoxy System Phthalic Anhydride Glycidyl Ether 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

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