Advertisement

Complexes of Aluminium(III) with Biologically Important Ligands

  • A. L. Petrou
  • M. Kollia
  • A.-I. Scourti
  • M. Chrycikopoulou
  • T. Mavromoystakos
  • E. Theodoropoulou
  • M.-H. Karatza
  • J. M. Tsangaris
Chapter
  • 263 Downloads
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASEN2, volume 26)

Abstract

A great interest to the study of the coordination of Aluminum(III) cation with various ligands of biological and/or environmental importance emerged because: (a) Aluminum(III) ion is associated with many neurotoxic conditions, well-known dementias and osteodystrophy [1]. High levels of aluminum were found in the brain of patients suffering from the Alzheimer’s disease, in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing treatment with large quantities of aluminum hydroxide phosphate-binding gels and in aluminum ball mill workers. (b) Aluminum has also been associated with anaemia [2]. The reason that Al(III)-induces anaemia is not well known. This particular anaenia is characterised by normal iron levels and reduced size of red blood cells (microcytosis). Aluminum(III) ion interferes with the synthesis of haemoglobin by lowering its levels, (c) Among the acute toxic effects of aluminum in animals are gastrointestinal disturbance, skin lesions and nervous affictions [1]. Parathyroid hormone increases gastrointestinal aluminum absorption on rats and changes its tissue distribution: increases aluminum levels in bones, kidney, muscle and the gray matter of brain. (d) Toxid effects of aluminum have been observed in a variety of organisms i.e. bacteria, a number of protozoa, invertebrates and vertebrates [ 1]. On aquatic organisms i.e. algae the effects were detected in the form of retardation of growth and death of cells, (e) The various species differ in their sensitivity to aluminum. In fish aluminum causes gill hyperplasia which ultimately leads to death[ 1].

Keywords

Magic Angle Spinning Picolinic Acid Aluminum Citrate Saccharic Acid Neurotoxic Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Ei-Ichiro Ochiai, (1987) General Principles of Biochemistry of the Elements Series Editor: Earl Frieden Plenum Press, N.Y. and London.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Sovago, L. Kiss, T. and Martin, R.B. (1990) 2.3-Diphosphoglycerate binding of Zn2+ and Al3+, Polyhedron. 9. 189–192.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Martin, R.B. (1986) Citrate Binding of Al3+ and Fe3+. J.Inorg.Biochemistry. 28, 181–187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kiss, T., Sovago, I. and Martin, R.B. (1989) Complexes of 3, 4-Dihydroxyphenyl Derivatives. 9. Al3+ Binding to Catecholamines and Tiron, J.Am.Chem.Soc., 111, 3611–3614.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Motekaitis, R.J. and Martell, A.E. (1984) (Complexes of Aluminum(III) with hydroxy Carboxylic Acids, inorg.Chem., 23, 18–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Feng, T.I., Tsangaris, J.M. and Barron, A.R. (1990) Complexes of Aluminium (III) with Picolinic and Pipecolinic Acids: An 27A1-NMR Investigation. Monatshefte fur Chemie, 121, 113–118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. L. Petrou
    • 1
  • M. Kollia
    • 1
  • A.-I. Scourti
    • 1
  • M. Chrycikopoulou
    • 1
  • T. Mavromoystakos
    • 2
  • E. Theodoropoulou
    • 2
  • M.-H. Karatza
    • 1
  • J. M. Tsangaris
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Inorganic ChemistryUniversity of AthensPanepistimiopolis, Kouponia, AthensGreece
  2. 2.Institute of Organic and Pharmaceutical ChemistryNational Hellenic Research FoundationAthensGreece
  3. 3.Laboratory of Inorganic ChemistryUniversity of IoanninaIoanninaGreece

Personalised recommendations