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B[e] Stars pp 135-136 | Cite as

Spectroscopy and Photometry of the B[e]—Star Candidates AS 78 and LS II +22°8

  • Tatiana A. Shejkina
  • Anatoly S. Miroshnichenko
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Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 233)

Abstract

Two poorly—studied emission—line stars AS 78 (V ~ 11 . m 2, B - V ~ 0 . m 7) and LS II +22°8 (V ~ 11 . m 9, B - V ~ 0 . m 6) were identified with IRAS sources 03549+5602 and 19381+2224 respectively by Dong & Hu (1991) among other sources having very strong infrared excesses, V-[25] > 8m . Only one U BV photometric observation has been published (Haug 1970) for AS 78 which was discovered by Miller & Merrill (1951) as a Be star. A spectral type of B9 I a or B2–5 v was estimated for LS ii +22°8 by Pesch (1963) from the U BV photometry while near—IR data (K = 9 . m 6, Allen 1973) show a very weak excess in this region. Here we present our recent observational results for these stars.

Keywords

Spectral Type Spectral Energy Distribution Carbon Star Balmer Line IRAS Source 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tatiana A. Shejkina
    • 1
  • Anatoly S. Miroshnichenko
    • 2
  1. 1.Fesenkov Astrophysical Institute of the Kazakhstan NationalAcademy of SciencesAlmatyKazakhstan
  2. 2.Central Astronomical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences at PulkovoSaint-PetersburgRussia

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