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Nitrogen Nutrition

  • E. G. Kirby
  • T. Leustek
  • M. S. Lee
Chapter
Part of the Forestry Sciences book series (FOSC, volume 24-26)

Abstract

Nitrogen assimilation and the role of nitrogen in plant growth and development are key issues in establishing a fundamental understanding of differentiation of plant cells. Nitrogen is found in a myriad of natural plant components. Proteins are composed of amino acids of which nitrogen is an integral part. Nucleic acids, which encode and transcribe a heritable blueprint for growth and development, are composed of nitrogenous bases. Plant growth regulating substances, including auxins and cytokinins, contain nitrogen. In addition to forming the backbone for polypeptides, amino acids perform numerous functions. Proline has been implicated as an osmoregulatory substance (14) and polyamines have been implicated in regulation of development (89).

Keywords

Nitrate Reductase Glutamine Synthetase Nitrogen Metabolism Plant Tissue Culture Physiol Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. G. Kirby
  • T. Leustek
  • M. S. Lee

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