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Changing Perceptions of Risk

The Implications for Management
  • Eve Coles
  • Denis Smith
  • Steve Tombs
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Natural and Technological Hazards Research book series (NTHR, volume 16)

Abstract

“Risk is like beauty — it exists in the eye of the beholder.” (Pitzer, 1999)

This book has sought to bring together a number of perspectives on the management of risk. Its ultimate aim has always been to raise the significance of risk within key areas of political and organisational activities and with a key focus on the management and control of that risk. There is little doubt that, in spite of our advances in knowledge and management practices, risk is destined to remain an issue of some concern. At the time of writing, for example, issues of risk and safety have once again been firmly catapulted to the top of the public agenda. Whilst there were a number of events that served to raise the public consciousness of risk — including the completion of the BSE inquiry, the anniversary of the Paddington rail crash, the impending inquiry into the sinking of the Marchioness and the sinking of a number of Greek ferries — two events will be highlighted to illustrate some of the key issues discussed in this text. These events are the crash of the Air France Concorde and the Firestone tyre recall.

Keywords

Risk Management Precautionary Principle Risk Management Practice National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Highway Traffic Safety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eve Coles
    • 1
  • Denis Smith
    • 1
  • Steve Tombs
    • 2
  1. 1.Sheffield University Management SchoolSheffieldUK
  2. 2.School of Law, Social Work, Social PolicyLiverpool John Moores University’LiverpoolUK

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