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Injury, Death and the Deregulation Fetish

The politics of occupational safety regulation in UK manufacturing industries
  • Steve Tombs
Chapter
  • 139 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Natural and Technological Hazards Research book series (NTHR, volume 16)

Abstract

In May 1994 the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) publicly reported upon its year long review into deregulation and UK health and safety legislation. The response of TUC secretary John Monks to the report was clearly one of relief. It should, he said, “mark the death of the deregulation fetish in health and safety” (Guardian, 25/5/94).

Keywords

Trade Union Injury Rate Occupational Safety Corporate Crime National Audit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steve Tombs
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Law, Social Work & Social PolicyLiverpool John Moores UniversityLiverpoolUK

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