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Labour mobility and tourism in the post 1989 transition in Hungary

  • Edith Szivas
  • Michael Riley
Chapter
Part of the The GeoJournal Library book series (GEJL, volume 65)

Abstract

Inter sectoral labour shifts into tourism employment have been characteristic features of economic development and restructuring in a wide range of economies. These inter-sectoral shifts, usually accompanied by some forms of spatial mobility, have been strongly influenced by the inherent characteristics of tourism employment, especially its image and flexibility. While, to some extent, these are universal, there is also evidence from the few detailed studies of tourism employment that the contingencies of time and place are significant. Most studies to date have been of particular tourism sectors in the developed economies, or of broader sectoral shifts from agriculture into tourism in the developing economies. This paper aims to extend the range of case studies, by analysing labour mobility into tourism in Hungary. Both the choice of country and the time scale (the post 1989 transition) provide an opportunity to examine labour mobility in context of the particular economic and political conditions of the transition from central planning towards a market economy.

Keywords

Tourism Development Labour Mobility Informal Economy Motivational Orientation Tourism Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edith Szivas
    • 1
  • Michael Riley
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Management Studies for the Service SectorUniversity of SurreyGuildfordEngland

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