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The Mechanism of Manipulation

  • Ali RiazEmail author
Chapter
  • 109 Downloads
Part of the Politics of South Asia book series (POSAS)

Abstract

A growing body of literature has shown that non-democratic regimes, particularly autocrats, have a range of strategies in their toolbox to manipulate elections. They are employed at various stages and different state institutions are used, separately or together, to ensure a victory for the incumbent. This chapter provides a detailed description of the methods used in the 2018 election in Bangladesh. It argues that the election commission, law enforcing agencies, civil administration, and the ruling party played pivotal roles and were in cahoots with each other. Arrests of opposition activists and candidates, allowing the ruling party activists to attack the rivals in the presence of police, adopting a double standard in disqualification of candidates were the tactics used. Besides, there is credible evidence that ballots in favor of ruling party candidates were stuffed in the ballot box the previous night.

Keywords

Manipulation Integrity Electoral exclusion Bangladesh Election Commission 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Politics and GovernmentIllinois State UniversityNormalUSA

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