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Introduction and Overview

  • Joseph Francois
  • Pradumna B. Rana
  • Ganeshan Wignaraja
Chapter

Abstract

East and South Asia followed different economic strategies in the 1970s and 1980s. East Asia adopted outward-oriented strategies and witnessed remarkable economic prosperity while inward- oriented South Asia largely stagnated.1 Not surprisingly, prior to 1990, East and South Asian economies were relatively isolated from one another and there was little talk of pan-Asian economic integration. The only trade agreement that covered the two subregions was the Bangkok Agreement signed in 1975 that included Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), Republic of Korea (henceforth Korea), and People’s Republic of China (PRC) (see Box 1.1). There was very little bilateral trade and investment among these countries. The adoption of a “Look East” Policy in India in 1991 marked the start of a new era in East and South Asia economic relations. Since then, there has been heightened policy interest in the process of pan-Asian integration, and particular interest in evolving economic relationships between the two subregions.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment World Trade Organization Free Trade Agreement Asian Development Bank Outward Foreign Direct Investment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Asian Development Bank 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Francois
  • Pradumna B. Rana
  • Ganeshan Wignaraja

There are no affiliations available

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