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Building up a Multilateral Strategy for the United States: Alvin Hansen, Jacob Viner, and the Council on Foreign Relations (1939–45)

  • Sebastiano Nerozzi
Chapter
Part of the Archival Insights into the Evolution of Economics book series (AIEE)

Abstract

The establishment of the financial and economic order after the Second World War is undoubtedly one of the most studied and discussed phases in the history of international economic relations. Eminent historians and economists have devoted great efforts to describing its origins, features and effects.

Keywords

Foreign Relation Multilateral Trade International Monetary System American Foreign Policy Bretton Wood System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sebastiano Nerozzi 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sebastiano Nerozzi

There are no affiliations available

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