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AIDS and Development

  • Kempe Ronald HopeSr.
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Abstract

However assessed or measured, the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), which is caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), continues to have serious development consequences for Africa with ricocheting consequences on the international community. Despite recent declines in prevalence rates in some countries, the disease has been undermining macroeconomic growth, foreign investment, human capital development, and governance in the region. Sub-Saharan Africa is the home to 24.7 million people who are living with HIV/AIDS. As of the end of 2006, this represented almost two-thirds (63 percent) of the world’s HIV-infected population. More than one-half (59 percent) of those African adults who are HIV-positive are women and more than 2 million Africans died (72 percent of global deaths due to AIDS) from the disease in 2006 (UNAIDS and WHO, 2006). Women are infected more often and earlier in their lives than men. Young women aged 15–24 are between two and six times as likely to be HIV-positive than men of similar age (UNAIDS, 2006). Southern Africa remains the epicenter of the global HIV epidemic with 32 percent of people with the disease globally living in this sub-region and 34 percent of AIDS deaths globally occurring there (UNAIDS, 2006).

Keywords

United Nations Male Circumcision Gross Domestic Product Growth Joint United Nations Programme United Nations Economic Commission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Kempe Ronald Hope, Sr. 2008

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  • Kempe Ronald HopeSr.

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