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Good Governance and Sustainable Development: The New Partnership for Africa’s Development and the African Peer Review Mechanism

  • Kempe Ronald HopeSr.
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Abstract

During the past two decades and beyond, Africa was described by various commentators as a continent betrayed, deprived, in chaos, in plight, in self-destruction, in crisis, shackled, existing in name only, being predatory or kleptocratic, collapsed into anarchy or viciousness, and being plundered (Ayittey, 1993, 1998; Hope, 2002a; Hope and Chikulo, 2000; Houngnikpo, 2006; Mbaku, 2007; Schwab, 2001; Guest, 2004). These are but a few of the colorful negative images painted about a continent that lacked the capacity and willingness to implement a sustained policy environment conducive to, among other things, good governance, entrenchment of democracy, peace and security, growth and development, and poverty reduction. However, a new generation of enlightened African leaders decided in the new millennium to stake Africa’s claim to the twenty-first century and help facilitate the continent’s quest to fulfill its promise of better development performance. In that regard, they produced a framework plan entitled the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD).

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Gross Domestic Product Corporate Governance Good Governance African Union 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Kempe Ronald Hope, Sr. 2008

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  • Kempe Ronald HopeSr.

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