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Democracy in Hybrid Governance

  • Chris Skelcher
  • Helen Sullivan
  • Stephen Jeffares
Chapter
  • 104 Downloads
Part of the Understanding Governance Series book series (TRG)

Abstract

If public administrators think of the relationship between network governance and representative democracy in different ways, as we showed in Chapter 5, what are the consequences of new practices of hybrid governance for the democratic fabric of our cities and societies? Governance transitions, such as those from the legacy of politically headed public bureaucracies to more diverse and hybridised forms of governance, are inevitably generative of democratic consequences. At a fundamental level, they change the structure of rules and incentives through which access to, and decisions within, and outcomes from the public policy process are configured. For example, the development of deliberative polling and new forms of e-democracy to some extent opens the black box of policy making to the ‘wisdom of the crowds’. And outside government itself, the growth of social-networking technology reduces the barriers to social movement formation and increases their ability to mobilise actions and support in new and almost instantaneous ways.

Keywords

European City Governance Institution Democratic Institution City Government Governance Arrangement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chris Skelcher, Helen Sullivan and Stephen Jeffares 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris Skelcher
    • 1
  • Helen Sullivan
    • 2
  • Stephen Jeffares
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BirminghamUK
  2. 2.University of MelbourneAustralia

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