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Presidential Strength and Party Leadership in Taiwan

  • Mitsutoyo Matsumoto
Chapter

Abstract

Among the Asian countries discussed in this book, Sri Lanka (Chapter 7) and Taiwan have semi-presidential systems. In this chapter, using Taiwan as a case study, I consider the factors that can give a president power over the parliament. Here, presidential power is measured as the degree to which a president can get his policies legislated (see Chapter 2).

Keywords

Party Leadership Executive Yuan Legislative Election Seat Share Divided Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Mitsutoyo Matsumoto 2013

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  • Mitsutoyo Matsumoto

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