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Wildlife Protection and Japan

  • Isao Miyaoka
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Part of the St Antony’s Series book series

Abstract

Before moving to the case studies of driftnet fishing, scientific whaling, and international trade in African elephant ivory with a focus on the period from 1987 to 1992, it is beneficial to look at the wider context of international wildlife protection and Japan’s action and inaction in this issue area. In this chapter, I first describe three international regimes on high seas fishing, commercial whaling, and trade in endangered species and Japan’s attitudes toward them. Then, I discuss the conservation principle of the wildlife protection regimes and explain the process by which Japan came to respect that principle.

Keywords

Exclusive Economic Zone Minke Whale Conservation Principle Living Resource Wildlife Protection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Isao Miyaoka 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isao Miyaoka
    • 1
  1. 1.Osaka University of Foreign StudiesJapan

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